Tag Archives: definitions

DEFINITION OF THE DAY (FACE)

The front of the person’s head. In the Bible several words are translated as “face.” In the OT panim is the most common and has the actual meaning of “face.” Aph (nose) and ayin (eyes, aspect) are also at times translated as face. In the NT the words used are opsis and prosopon.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (TRINITY PT3)

Throughout the history of Christianity, there have been many attempts to communicate coherently what the Bible teaches about the identity of God. Inevitably, some of these attempts have been woefully inadequate, erring in ways that result in a mony to His triune identity.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (SON OF GOD)

Term used to express the deity of Jesus of Nazareth as the one, unique Son of God. In the OT certain men and angels (Gen 6:1-4; Psa 29:1; 82:6; 89:6) are called “sons of God” (note text notes in modern translations). The people of Israel were corporately considered the son of God (Exod 4:22; Jer 31:20; Hos 11:1). The concept also is employed in the OT with reference to the king as God’s son (Psa 2:7). The promises found in the David covenant (2 Sam 7:14) are the source for this special filial relationship. The title can be found occasionally in intertestamental literature (Ezra 7:28-29; 13:32,37,52; 14:9).

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (LUCIFER)

Latin translation (followed by the KJV) of the Hebrews word for “day star” in Isa 14:12, where the word is used as a title for the king of Babylon, who had exalted himself as a god. The

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (ANGEL 1 OF 3)

Created beings whose primary function is to serve and worship God. Though some interpret the “us” in Gen 1:26 as inclusive of God and His angelic court, the Bible does not comment as to when they were created. Unlike God they are not eternal or omniscient. The Hebrew word in the OT is mal’ak, and the NT Greek word is angelos. They both mean “messenger” and occasionally refer to human messengers.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (SERVICE)

Work done for other people or for God and the worship of God. Jacob worked for Laban seven years for each of his wives (Gen 29:15-30). Service could be slave labor (Exod 5:11; Lev 25:39; 1 Kings 12:4; Isa 14:3 cp Lam 1:3), farm work (1 Chron 27:26), or daily labor on the job (Psa 104:23). It could be service of earthly kingdoms (2 Chron 12:8; cp 1 Chron 26:30), of God’s place of worship (Exod 20:16; cp Num 4:47; 1 Chron 23:24), of God’s ministers (Ezra 8:20), and of God (Josh 22:27). Not only people do service; God also done service (Isa 28:21). Even righteousness has a service (Isa 32:17).

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (THEATER)

Public drama was apparently unknown in OT Israel except for possible worship activities and only arrived with the Greeks after 400 B.C. As a symbol of Greco-Roman culture, the presence of theaters in Palestine was a constant reminder of Greek and Roman control of the Jewish state.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (MYSTERY RELEIGIONS PT 2 OF 2)

Many, but not all, of the deities worshiped in the mysteries were originally associated with fertility. As such, their associated myths often referred to the natural cycle as it waxes and wanes (for instance, Demeter) or to the dying and rising of a god (Attis, Adonis, Osirs). Some scholars thing that the mysteries used this feature of the myth to give symbolic expression of rising to immorality with the deity. However, not all scholars agree; some deities venerated in mystery religions did not die or rise; moreover, the exact use of the myth in the mysteries is often unclear, though some concept of immorality seems to be implied.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (MYSTERY RELIGIONS PT 1 OF 2)

Several different cults or societies characterized in part by elaborate initiation rituals and secret rites. Though attested in Greece before 600 B.C., the mystery religions flourished during the Hellenistic and Roman periods (after 333 B.C.) before dying out before A.D. 500. In particular the intermingling of religious concepts made possible by Alexander the Great’s far-flung conquests accelerated the spread of some cults and facilitated the development of

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (SPORTS)

The Hebrew verb “make sport” is used to indicate ridicule (e.g. Gen 21:9) but also sport in the sense of entertainment (Jug 16:25,27) or play (Exod 32:6; 104:26; Zech 8:5).

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