Tag Archives: Luke

BIBLE CUSTOMS AND CURIOSITIES (A KING IN A STABLE)

After His birth in a stable in Bethlehem, the baby Jesus was placed in a manger, a feeding trough for livestock. This manger may have been hewed out of rock. Stone mangers about tree feet long, eighteen inches wide, and two feet deep have been discovered in the ruins of King Ahab’s stables at the ancient city of Megiddo.

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WOMEN OF THE BIBLE (MARY MAGDALENE “CLINGING TO CHIRST”)

When discussing the most devoted followers of Jesus’ the New Testament writers say far less about three of the apostles-Barholomew; James, son of Alphaeus; and Thaddaeus (likely the nickname for Judas, the son of James)-than they say about Mary Magdalene.

She was from Magdala, a small town in Galilee in northern Israel, And since Mary was such a popular name in the New Testament, people took to calling this particular Mary by her hometown.

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EVERYDAY LIFE IN BIBLE TIMES (TAX COLLECTOR PT2)

We also find Jesus using the perceptions linked with tax collectors to jolt the Jewish leaders from their complacency. While he was teaching in the temple courts during the final week of his life on earth, Jesus frequently clashed with the Jewish leaders, who questioned his authority and resisted his invitations to know him as their Savior from sin.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (PRAISE)

One of humanity’s many responses to God’s revelation of Himself. The Bible recognizes that men and women also may be the objects of praise, either from other people (Prov 27:21; 31:30) or from God Himself (Rom 2:29), and that angels and the natural world are likewise capable of praising God (Ps 148). Nevertheless, human praise of God is one of Scripture’s major themes.

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EVERYDAY LIFE IN BIBLE TIMES (TAX COLLECTOR PT1)

During the Roman era, tax collectors and the manner in which taxes were collected evolved and varied from one region to the next. Here we offer a general picture of the process that will allow us to appreciate the role tax collectors played in the Gospels. Taxes were paid to both the temple and the state, each of which established its own tax code without consideration of the other. First-century Jews paid a religious tithe of their produce, herd, and flock (Lev 27:30-32); they were also required to pay the half-shekel or two-drachma tax for sanctuary upkeep (Exod 30:13; Matt 17:24). The state demanded taxes that included a poll tax levied on males fourteen to sixty-five years of age and females twelve to sixty-five, real estate tax, customs tax collected at road and harbor stations, a tax on produce that amounted to 10 percent on grain and 20 percent on wine, fruit, and oil, a 1 percent income tax, and sales and inheritance taxes.

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THE PASSOVER IN THE BIBLE

In Exodus 12, God gives Moses the instructions and requirements for the Passover.

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JESUS AND THE NAMES OF GOD

The New Testament alludes to Jesus’ divine nature by comparing Jesus to several names and attributes used for God. Here are a few examples of Jesus being compared to God.

JESUS IS GOD: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” (John 1:1).

JESUS IS ONE WITH GOD: Jesus said, “I and the Father are one.” (John 10:30).

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THE BEATITUDES

WHAT DO THE BEATITIUDDES MEAN?

Jesus surprised his disciples by telling them what kind of people would be blessed by God. His list of traits are called the Beatitudes, meaning “to bless” or “to make happy.”

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (MONEY CHANGERS)

Persons whose profession was to sell or exchange Roman or other moneys for Jewish money acceptable in the temple worship. In NT times regions and cities issued their own money. This caused Jews of the Dispersion, those who lived outside of Judea, to bring many kinds of money to Jerusalem. To help visitors change money into that acceptable in Jerusalem, money changers set up tables in the temple court of the Gentiles. Syrian silver coins were the money of Jerusalem then, and worshipers used them to pay their temple tax of a half shekel and to buy sacrifices for the altar.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (GHOST)

KJV uses “ghost” in two senses, for the human life force and for God’s Holy Spirit. KJV never uses “ghost” for the disembodied spirits of the dead. All 11 OT references involves the phrases “give up the ghost” (e.g., Gen 25:8; 35:29), which means to cease breathing or simply to die. This phrase occurs eight times in the NT (Matt 27:50; Acts 5:5; 12:23). The predominant NT use is for the Holy Spirit.

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