Tag Archives: definition of the day

DEFINITION OF THE DAY (HUNT/HUNTER)

To pursue game for food or pleasure. Hunting was an important supplementary food source, especially in the seminomadic stage of civilization. Genesis mentions several hunters by name, none of whom are Israelite ancestors (Nimrod, 10:9; Ishmael 21:20; Esau, 25:27), perhaps suggesting that hunting was more characteristic of Israel’s neighbors than of Israel. Hunting was, however, regulated by Mosaic law. The blood of captured game was to be poured out on the ground (Lev 17:13). Deuteronomy 14:3-5 outlines what game was permitted as ritually clean food.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (MONEY CHANGERS)

Persons whose profession was to sell or exchange Roman or other moneys for Jewish money acceptable in the temple worship. In NT times regions and cities issued their own money. This caused Jews of the Dispersion, those who lived outside of Judea, to bring many kinds of money to Jerusalem. To help visitors change money into that acceptable in Jerusalem, money changers set up tables in the temple court of the Gentiles. Syrian silver coins were the money of Jerusalem then, and worshipers used them to pay their temple tax of a half shekel and to buy sacrifices for the altar.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (INN)

Different kinds of shelters or dwellings. In the OT the Hebrew word translated “inn” or “lodging place” might refer to a camping place for an individual (Jer 9:2), a family on a journey (Exod 4:24), an entire caravan (Gen 42:27; 43:21), or an army (Josh 4:3,8). In these passages (with the possible exception of the reference in Jeremiah) the presence of a building is not implied. Often the reference is only to a convenient piece of ground near a spring. It is doubtful that inns in the sense of public inns with a building existed in OT times.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (GHOST)

KJV uses “ghost” in two senses, for the human life force and for God’s Holy Spirit. KJV never uses “ghost” for the disembodied spirits of the dead. All 11 OT references involves the phrases “give up the ghost” (e.g., Gen 25:8; 35:29), which means to cease breathing or simply to die. This phrase occurs eight times in the NT (Matt 27:50; Acts 5:5; 12:23). The predominant NT use is for the Holy Spirit.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (BLOOD OF CHRIST-MEANING AND EFFECTS)

The term “blood of Christ” designates in the NT the atoning death of Christ. Atonement refers to the basis and process by which estranged people become at one with God (atonement=at-one-ment). When we identify with Jesus, we are no longer at odds with God. The meaning of Christ’s death is a great mystery. The NT seeks to express this meaning in

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (DEAD SEA)

Inland lake at the end of the Jordan Valley on the southeastern border of Canaan with no outlets for water it receives; known as Salt Sea, Sea of the Plain, and Eastern Sea. Its current English name was applied to it through writings after A.D. 100. It is about 50 miles long and 10 miles wide at its widest point. The surface of the sea is 1,292 feet below the level of the Mediterranean Sea. At its deepest point the lake is 1,300 feet deep. At its most shallow, it is only 10 to 15 feet deep.

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (ITHAMAR)

Personal name of uncertain meaning, perhaps “island of palms,” or “where is Tamar,” or shortened form of “father of Tamar (palms).” Fourth son of Aaron the priest (Exod 6:23). After the death of Nadab and Abihu, Ithamar and his surviving brother Eleazar rose to prominence. During the wilderness years Ithamar apparently was in charge of all the Levites (Exod 38:21).

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (RIDDLE)

Enigmatic or puzzling statement, often based on the clever use of the ambiguities of language. The classic biblical example of a riddle is that posed by Samson to the Philistines. This riddle is in poetic form (judg 14:12-12), and the question, “What is it?” is implied. The Philistines’ reply is in the form of another riddle (v 18a) whose original answer was probably “love.” Samson’s retort may reflect yet another commonly known, and rather risque’ riddle (v 18b).

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DEFINITION OF THE DAY (GRAIN)

General term for the edible seed of cultivated grasses. Common grains in the biblical world included wheat (Gen 30:14), spelt or emmer (REB vetches) (Exod 9:32), barley (Exod 9:31), and millet (Ezek 4:9). The KJV normally renders grain as corn, which does not mean “maize” (as in American usage), but any grain.

DEFINITION OF THE DAY (HELPMEET)

KJV term for woman as a helper precisely adapted to man (Gen 2:18). Modern translations supply various equivalents: help suitable for him (NASB, NIV); help as his partner (NRSV); a suitable companion for him (TEV). The noun translated “help” or “partner” does not suggest subordination. Elsewhere the term is used of God as Help (1 Chorn 12:18; Psa 30:10; 54:4; 121:1)

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